Scout Oath
On my honor I will do my best
To do my duty to God and my country
and to obey the Scout Law;
To help other people at all times;
To keep myself physically strong, mentally awake, and morally straight.

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William T Hornaday Awards

This conservation awards program was initiated in 1914 by Dr. William T. Hornaday, then director of the New York Zoological Park, in an effort to inspire members of the Boy Scouts of America to work constructively for conservation. For 20 years the program was funded through Hornaday's Permanent Wildlife Protection Fund. Upon his death, the program was sponsored for 35 years by the New York Zoological Society and named in Hornaday's honor. The award is the oldest conservation award given in America. A recently revised application package takes into consideration the achievements of Venturer working on or who have earned the Ranger award. Ventures have until their 21 birthday to complete the requirements.

The unit certificate and badge are awarded by the local council's conservation committee. Application is made through the local council. Councils may obtain unit certificates and badges by sending approved award applications to the Boy Scout Conservation Service at the national office.

The bronze medal is awarded by the National Council upon recommendation of the local council. A qualified Venturer must apply through and be recommended by his or her local council. Final selection is made by a national William T. Hornaday Award selection committee, and presentation is made by the local council.

The silver medal is handled in the same way as the bronze medal in regard to recommendation and application. The award is the highest possible attainment in conservation for a Venturer.

The gold medal may be considered when a qualified Scouter is recommended by his or her council, by an established conservation organization, or by any recognized conservationist. The nominee must have demonstrated leadership and a commitment to the education of youth on a national or international level, reflecting the natural resource conservation/environmental awareness mission of the Boy Scouts of America. Nominations must be approved by the BSA's national conservation committee. The gold medal is the highest possible attainment in conservation for a Scouter.
Bronze Medal

The gold badge is awarded by the local council's conservation committee. Scouters who have demonstrated leadership and a significant commitment to conservation and the education of Scouting youth on a council or district level over a sustained period (at least three years) may be nominated for this award. Councils may obtain gold badges by sending approved award applications to the Boy Scout Conservation Service at the national office.

The gold certificate is an award granted to an individual or organization not necessarily affiliated with Scouting. The nominee must have demonstrated leadership and a commitment to the education of youth on a national or international level, reflecting the natural resource conservation/environmental awareness mission of the Boy Scouts of America.

Nominations for the medals and gold certificate are considered by the national award committee several times a year.


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